Preparing data for you could take a moment.
Thank you for your patience.
It is worth the wait.
We frequently make our website faster.
Dialysis In Nursing Homes

Dialysis In Nursing Homes

More and more people in the U.S have been experiencing kidney failure. In 2018, 768,000 Americans were living with ESRD, or end-stage renal disease. Most of the patients living with ESRD are seniors, 80% being over the age of 65. The most common treatment is dialysis, which mainly occurs in a medical setting, outside a patient’s home. When ESRD affects a mobility-challenged senior, it can make going daily extremely challenging. Outpatient providers have failed to address the needs of an ageing population of patients with ESRD, especially nursing home residents.

Nursing homes need 3-day on-site dialysis, not daily dialysis. The benefits for residents can make the experience smoother and safer. When using on-site dialysis, it eliminates 17% of treatment time, not to mention the hours patients spend travelling off-site. Not only speed but safety also, daily dialysis causes a greater risk of hospitalization or surgery. 3-day dialysis will also mean facilities can treat more patients with the same initial investment.

Learn more about dialysis in nursing homes in the infographic below:

Dialysis in Nursing Homes

Dialysis in Nursing HomesSource

The Phone Repair Economy

The Phone Repair Economy

Our phones break all the time. It’s just one of the aggravating things we’ve gotten used to since we started carrying these mini-computers with us everywhere we go. In 2021 alone, Americans are expected to spend 4 billion dollars on phone repairs and 59 billion on new phones. So, is a new phone always worth it? Sometimes, a phone repair may actually be the better answer. 

The lifecycle of the average smartphone is actually on the increase. From 2016 to 2019, smartphone lifecycles grew from 23 to 33 months. The reasons for this are largely due to increased cost, phone evolution, and revamped carrier contracts. 

We simply aren’t as excited about new features as we once were. Phone evolution seems to have peaked in many ways. For many years, new phones included new “wow features” that got everyone talking and eager to upgrade, but these days the newest features just aren’t as big of a deal. They’re more like a minor tweak of the old rather than an overhaul or an entirely new feature. Of people who spend over $1000 on new phones, only 7% say they’re likely to purchase a 5G device as soon as it’s available. 

High prices are also a significant deterrent to purchasing a new phone. From 2016 to 2019 the top three smartphone brands hiked up their prices by 52%. Many of us just can’t afford the price anymore, especially since new carrier contracts often no longer include the 2-year upgrade cycle. These days, consumers are more likely to pay full prices and it can take 2 years or longer to pay off the new phone. 

Sometimes a new phone just isn’t worth it. Repairing your broken phone might actually be the better solution. The benefits of repair vs. replace are not only to our personal wallets, but it’s also better for the environment. Repairing reduces energy emissions and e-waste as fewer phones are having to be produced. It also saves energy as manufacturing new devices takes more energy than repairing old ones. Repairing is also more convenient for the consumer since they don’t need to set up a new phone, and of course, it’s usually cheaper than buying a new phone. Next time your phone breaks, take the time to consider all your options before jumping to a phone upgrade. 

A Look at the Phone Repair Economy

A Look at the Phone Repair Economy
Source

Closing the Gap on Vaccine Hesitancy

Closing the Gap on Vaccine Hesitancy

The majority of the US population is on board with getting vaccinated, but there are still a few people in our society who are hesitant to get the jab. Currently, vaccine confidence has reached a plateau and,  unless about 10-15% of the population changes their minds, we won’t achieve the necessary 70 – 85% vaccinated requirements to create herd immunity. Fortunately, the solutions to this problem can be simpler than you think. 

Those who are vaccine confident versus those who are not can be broken down into various categories of people. First, social media users. Eighty-three percent of social media users have either been vaccinated or are willing to be vaccinated. Ninety-two percent of them believe the COVID vaccines are safe, and 86% believe COVID vaccines are effective. 

Other categories to look at are divided by political affiliations, race, and geography. In the political affiliation category, the most likely to be vaccinated are the mainstream left at 95%, and the least likely are the right at 65%, with apolitical and educated left falling between, but majority pro-vaccine. 

Geographically speaking, those in rural communities are 90% likely to be vaccinated, and those in urban communities are 93% likely. 

In the category of race, the most likely to be vaccinated are Asian-Americans at 94%, then Hispanic-Americans at 93%, Caucasian at 90%, and lastly, Black/African-Americans at 88%. 

The two main reasons why the right-wing population are vaccine-hesitant are freedom of choice, and concern about side effects. Concern about side effects also correlates with the willingness or unwillingness to vaccinate among the above-mentioned races. 

Vaccine Confidence

Vaccine Confidence
Via: realchemistry.comSource

Digital Health is the Future

Digital Health is the Future

Since the onset of the COVID pandemic, digital health advancement has picked up the pace to make rapid progress in every area of medicine. Thankfully, at the height of the spread of COVID, healthcare was able to continue without missing a beat due to changes to things such as telehealth and a full embrace of digital health

Today, doctors are more digital than ever, with 80% embracing health-related technology in their personal and/or professional lives. Sixty-two percent of physicians personally use health apps and 57% recommend them to their patients. The same goes for smartwatches with 41% personal use and 43% recommendations. Physicians also go digital by visiting healthcare sites to gather information with the most visited sites being UptoDate, Sermo, and WebMD. 

Ninety percent of doctors are also using social media professionally. They communicate with other physicians, share videos with patients, repost messages for professional use, and post-professional updates. The most used sites are Google search, YouTube, Facebook, and WhatsApp. 

Currently, more than 1 in 4 doctors are high adopters of digital technology in their practice. These doctors treat patients with a different outlook. They are 211% more likely to recommend smart gym equipment, 200% more likely to recommend smartwatches, and 182% more likely to recommend fitness wearables. These doctors strongly believe that embracing digital health tech greatly improves patient care by enabling easy access to health information, enhancing remote monitoring care, and increasing patient engagement for better health outcomes. These doctors are also more likely to offer valuable digital health tools, such as online scheduling and in-office kiosks. Digital health is taking healthcare to the future.

Acceleration of Digital Health

Acceleration of Digital Health
Via: realchemistry.comSource